Gris Visage

Specialization is for insects

The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything.

Scott Woods (X)

he motherfucking dropped the truth.

(via mesmerisme)

(Source: luvyourselfsomeesteem, via badveganwolf)

fuks:

A Vancouver charity, RainCity Housing, is converting city benches into pop-up shelters for homeless people. And by giving homeless people in this rainy city some dry coverage and a place to rest, RainCity is putting London’s anti-homeless spikes to shame.

(via samanticshift)

slytherinandgetcomfortable:

kimmysoo:

tiaraloveskandlupita:

irelandsowl:

glitterandmetal-yt-da:

youngblackandvegan:

kawaiiflowerchild:

Michaela DePrince 

 THIS IS SO FUCKING IMPORTANT!

black ballerina excellence

So gorgeous and elegant

Why is this important? i see a girl doing ballet, stop outlining difference, its important we just admire the skills, and afore mentioned ellegance

First of all shut the fuck up and have several seats 

and heres why in Michaela’s own words what she had to go through beig BLACK and still goes through

When she was around 8 and rehearsing for The Nutcracker, just a few days before the performance she was told, “I’m sorry, you can’t do it. America’s not ready for a black girl ballerina.”

For Michaela, “to say this to an 8-year-old is just devastating. It was terrible.”

When she was 9, a teacher told her mother: “I don’t like to put money into black dancers because they grow up and end up having big boobs and big hips.”

The dancer looked down at her petite figure and protested, “I don’t have boobs. I don’t get it.”

Instead of getting her down, “It makes me more determined,” she said. “Because I’ve been through so much, I know now that I can make it and I can help other kids who have been in really bad situations realize that they can make it too.”

This is why it is important, for little Black girls to see a black ballerina made it despite being discriminated against because of her skin color!!! 

If I could just put my incredible insignificant two cents in here…

I grew up a ballet dancer. One year at Nutcracker auditions (I was… 13 I think) the “judges” were putting one of my friends through the Clara audition sequence and one of the girls turned to my little group of friends and I, leaned over and said, with a very disgruntled look on her face: “she can’t be Clara… she’s black.”

My friend was a tan Korean. 

Not even black. 

It took every ounce of me to not smack the bun off her head. The “judges” were watching. I wanted a part. In retrospect, I should have done it anyway. 

I only said: “she’s amazing, though, and deserves the part.”

Michaela is amazing. She lived in an orphanage in Sierra Leone during the civil war after her father was shot by rebels and her mother starved to death.  She has vitiligo and was called a “devil’s child” because of it.  She fled to a refugee camp after her orphanage was bombed and she was later adopted when she was 4 along with her sister Mia even though her adoptive parents were only planning on adopting Mia.  Because of her vitiligo no one wanted to adopt her, but they did.  Her mother has to dye the nylon parts of all her costumes by hand because they don’t make them in her skin colour.  She’s faced a ton of adversity in her life, and continues to in part because of racism towards her as a black ballerina. Everybody should watch the documentary First Position on Netflix.  She’s one of the stars in it and it’s awesome.

(via korraisnottan)

I firmly believe in small gestures: pay for their coffee, hold the door for strangers, over tip, smile or try to be kind even when you don’t feel like it, pay compliments, chase the kid’s runaway ball down the sidewalk and throw it back to him, try to be larger than you are— particularly when it’s difficult. People do notice, people appreciate. I appreciate it when it’s done to (for) me. Small gestures can be an effort, or actually go against our grain (“I’m not a big one for paying compliments…”), but the irony is that almost every time you make them, you feel better about yourself. For a moment life suddenly feels lighter, a bit more Gene Kelly dancing in the rain.

—Jonathan Carroll (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via sweetsouthern88)

handlessmaiden:

theperksofbeingdisabled:

ted:

Comedian and journalist Stella Young is tired of people telling her she’s an “inspiration” just for getting up in the morning. In a hilarious, hard-hitting, and thought-provoking talk at TEDxSydney, she explains why.   

Watch the full talk here»

Already posted the link to the TED Talk, but I’m reblogging because this is awesome. Everything I’ve always wanted to say summed up in a few well versed lines.

Thank you!

Those who claim that sex is determined by chromosomes must not realize that sex is assigned at birth not by chromosomes, not even by gonads, but by genitals. In fact, the vast majority of us never learn what our sex chromosomes are. Sex isn’t something we’re actually born with, it’s something that doctors or our parents assign us at birth. So if sex is determined by genitals, they must be clearly binary and unchangeable, right? Wrong. Genitals can be ambiguous at birth and many trans people get gender confirmation surgery to change them. Neither chromosomes nor genitals are binary in the way that “biological sex” defenders claim they are, and the vast majority of measures by which we judge sex are very much changeable.

While it is true that gender and sex are different things, and that gender is indeed a social construct, sex isn’t the Ultimate Biological Reality that transphobes make it out to be. There’s nothing intrinsically male about XY chromosomes, testosterone, body hair, muscle mass or penises. If an alien civilization found earth, they wouldn’t look at a person with a penis and say “Oh, that must be a male, sex based on genitalia is the One Universal Constant.” Sex, like gender, is indeed socially constructed and can be changed.

edemamemama:

standingintheriver:

Children are not possessions.
Children are not accessories.
Children are not relationship band aids.
They are tiny people with the same amount of feelings as an adult.

But with less capacity to process, express and healthily contain those feelings when necessary.

Be kind to them.

(Source: riverbete, via stepdad-complex)

vampmissedith:

When I was a freshman, my sister was in eighth grade. There was a boy in two of her periods who would ask her out every single day. (Third and seventh period, if I remember correctly.) All day during third and seventh she would repeatedly tell him no. She didn’t beat around the bush, she didn’t lie and say she was taken—she just said no.

One day, in third period, after being rejected several times, he said; “I have a gun in my locker. If you don’t say yes, I am going to shoot you in seventh.”

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miss-love:

I think it’s really hard for bisexuals because there is the illusion of choice. Because obviously being in a gay relationship isn’t as easy as being in a straight relationship. [x

So important

(Source: miles-luna, via theunicornkittenkween)